Jim Carrey’s wild personality, kooky facial expressions, and outlandish sense of humor have been making the world chuckle since the ’80s. After snagging a gig on The Tonight Show at the age of 21, he parlayed his newfound success into a recurring spot on the ’90s sketch comedy show In Living Color. He tickled our funny bones as he depicted memorable characters, such as Fire Marshall Bill and the buff bodybuilder Vila de Milo, and it was clear as day that Carrey had no limit to how far he would go to bring laughter into his fans’ lives.

Box office success soon followed, with movies such as Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and Dumb and Dumber, but despite his accomplishments, he has struggled with inner turmoil that manifested itself during his childhood and wreaked havoc in his life well into his adult years. His goofy personality and his penchant for comedy can be described as protective shields that hide his angst. From depression to homelessness, the trials and tribulations he has experienced are no laughing matter. This is the tragic real-life story of Jim Carrey. 

He grew up terrified that the Grim reaper would come for his parents

Jim Carrey grew up grappling with a fear that his parents, who were “heavy smokers” weren’t going to survive. “I remember locking myself in the bathroom and crying because I thought they were going to die. They banged on the door, telling me to come out. I don’t know if I got over that fear at that time; it was just kind of with me,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. His fears heightened as his mom freely talked about her own mortality. “I remember being seven years old and my mother at the dinner table saying things like, ‘My brain is deteriorating at an incredible rate!’ or ‘My angina’s acting up; I could go at any time!'” he recalled. “Things like that would just shake me to the core.”

Those tragic childhood circumstances inspired Carrey to pen 2013 children’s book, How Roland Rolls, which tackles some of the serious topics that affect young people. “One of the things I’ve always wanted to talk about or deal with is the fact that kids have profound feelings and profound questions that people don’t give them credit for. They think about life and death and ‘What happens when something happens to Mom? What happens when something happens to me?'”

Carrey eventually came to grips with his mom’s outspoken banter, realizing it was her way of “getting attention and getting love,” — but it was at the cost of scaring the bejesus out of him.

Jim Carrey grew up grappling with a fear that his parents, who were “heavy smokers” weren’t going to survive. “I remember locking myself in the bathroom and crying because I thought they were going to die. They banged on the door, telling me to come out. I don’t know if I got over that fear at that time; it was just kind of with me,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. His fears heightened as his mom freely talked about her own mortality. “I remember being seven years old and my mother at the dinner table saying things like, ‘My brain is deteriorating at an incredible rate!’ or ‘My angina’s acting up; I could go at any time!'” he recalled. “Things like that would just shake me to the core.”

Those tragic childhood circumstances inspired Carrey to pen 2013 children’s book, How Roland Rolls, which tackles some of the serious topics that affect young people. “One of the things I’ve always wanted to talk about or deal with is the fact that kids have profound feelings and profound questions that people don’t give them credit for. They think about life and death and ‘What happens when something happens to Mom? What happens when something happens to me?'”

Carrey eventually came to grips with his mom’s outspoken banter, realizing it was her way of “getting attention and getting love,” — but it was at the cost of scaring the bejesus out of him.

Carrey Dropped Out of School To Support His Impoverished Family

At the age of 10, Carrey wrote a heartfelt letter to The Carol Burnett Show in hopes of showing off his “150 voices” on the program. He waited for a reply and was finally greeted with a rejection letter from the TV personality, who told him the program was “just grown-ups” and encouraged Carrey to “stay in school, study hard.”

Sadly, Carrey wasn’t able to heed her advice after his father lost his job as an accountant. In order to help his family make ends meet, the Bruce Almighty star dropped out of school on his 16th birthday, according to CBS News. “We were experiencing poverty at that point. We all got a job, where the whole family had to work as security guards and janitors.” There was a bright side to his early exit from school. Carrey was determined not to be a looo-hoo-zuh-her, so he spent his time away from the classroom working on his comedy act “full-time.” And, boy, did that pay off.

0